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Incoming Medium- and Heavy-Duty Electric Trucks Bring High-Power Needs

As investments in electric fleets grow, the spotlight is on electric utilities and how they can evolve to support electric transportation.

Incoming Medium - and Heavy-Duty Electric Trucks Bring High-Power Needs

As investments in electric fleets grow, the spotlight is on electric utilities and how they can evolve to support electric transportation.

Zero-emission vehicle adoption, particularly in the medium- and heavy-duty space, is expected to continue climbing for several reasons. First, a global focus on improving air quality is driving zero-emission vehicle regulation. In the United States in June, the California Air Resources Board (CARB) mandated that half the state’s trucks be zero-emission by 2035.

As vehicle manufacturers ramp up electric medium- and heavy-duty vehicle production, fleet managers are preparing for an electric future for another reason: cost. Electric trucks have a lower total cost of ownership over the vehicle life. Plus, drivers themselves prefer the smooth, quieter ride, and in an industry where drivers are in-demand, electric vehicles can be a perk.

These factors add up to one important point for electric utilities: now is the time to prepare. With hundreds of thousands of commercial electric trucks on the roadways within the next decade, utilities will experience the impact of simultaneous charging, corridor charging hubs, and large charging depots―all with charging requirements of 5 MW, 10 MW or more.

In this revolutionary shift to zero-emission, bringing high-powered charging stakeholders together is crucial to success. This was the topic of the Utility Dive webinar:  How Utilities Can Support the Future of Electric Transformation with Paul Stith, Director of Strategy and Innovation, Black and Veatch; Rustam Kocher, E-Mobility Ecosystem Leader, Daimler Trucks North America; and Mike Roeth, Executive Director of the North American Council for Freight Efficiency.

Following a short presentation, the speakers spent the remaining time answering questions from the engaged audience of utility and EV stakeholders. With an overflow of audience questions, the presenters organized questions they weren’t able to address live by topic and recorded a follow-up Q&A and discussion.

Watch Both Webinars Now:

How Utilities Can Support the Future of Electrification

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Follow-Up Discussion: How Utilities Can Support the Future of Electrification

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